S-Cool Revision Summary

S-Cool Revision Summary

Emma (1816) was the last of Austen's mature novels published in her lifetime. This shows in its artful structure and use of irony.

Offers a new kind of realism compared with popular fantasy romances - the social situations are familiar and believable.

Can be viewed as a detective novel. The plot is like the riddles Harriet Smith collects - the answer is courtship, but both the reader and the characters have to figure out who will marry whom.

Can also be seen as a novel about education and personal growth. Over the course of one year, through certain key scenes, Emma learns from her mistakes in judging others and herself.

Emma
Copyright S-cool A leader Copyright S-cool Spoilt and bossy
Copyright S-cool Pretty and clever Copyright S-cool Vain
Copyright S-cool Gives to the poor Copyright S-cool Lets her imagination run away with her
Copyright S-cool Learns from her mistakes Copyright S-cool Snobbish
Copyright S-cool Kind and patient with father and nephews    
Mr. Knightley
Copyright S-cool Frank, honest and open Copyright S-cool Rather serious and unflattering
Copyright S-cool Kind. Judges people wisely and accurately Copyright S-cool Behaves like an older man - rarely dances, likes working alone at home
Frank Churchill
Copyright S-cool Warm, sociable and fun Copyright S-cool Dishonest in concealing his engagement
Copyright S-cool Genuinely sorry for the hurt he causes Copyright S-cool A flirt, who plays potentially hurtful games.
    Copyright S-cool Weak
Jane Fairfax
Copyright S-cool Talented musician, well-educated and polite Copyright S-cool Painfully reserved and unwilling to open up to people.
    Copyright S-cool Conceals her engagement
Harriet Smith
Copyright S-cool Sweet, simple and tenderhearted. Copyright S-cool Silly and easily-led
Copyright S-cool Forgives easily, and can be influenced in a positive way Copyright S-cool Falls in love at the drop of hat
Robert Martin
Copyright S-cool Responsible and successful Copyright S-cool Ugly
Copyright S-cool Manly, sincere and constant in love Copyright S-cool Comes from a fairly low social rank (a negative quality in the Highbury world)
Mr Elton
Copyright S-cool Popular, attractive and sociable Copyright S-cool Sentimental, proud, and after money

Areas of Study

Reason versus Imagination Social Class and Status
Riddles and Games Letters and Language
Openness versus Concealment The Position of Women

Sample Questions

How does Frank Churchill's arrival change the social world of Highbury?

'Emma demonstrates that there is always more than one way of reading people and what they say.' Comment on the importance of reading and misreading in the novel.