S-Cool Revision Summary

S-Cool Revision Summary

  • The 6 billion population of the world put pressure on the resources of the world, which in some cases are insufficient, and in some cases are rapidly running out.
  • Resources can be easily divided into two sections: Renewable and Non-renewable.
  • Renewable resources are ones that will never run out, either naturally or through good management.
  • Examples include forests, fish, animals, water and the sun.
  • Non-renewable resources are ones that will eventually run out. They are described as being finite.
  • Examples include oil, gas, coal, and minerals.
  • The level of development that a country has reached can directly affect which natural resources they use.
  • Most of the major population growth has occurred in developing countries in places like Africa, where the pressure on food resources is intense.
  • Management of resources can include methods such as producing alternative forms of energy (HEP, wind power, solar power, geothermal power), conserving resources (forestry, fishing quotas) , resource substitution, recycling and pollution controls.
  • Dartmoor is one of the 12 designated National Parks in England and Wales.
  • They aimed to preserve and enhance the natural beauty of the area and promote the enjoyment of the area by the general public.
  • Dartmoor plays host to over 8 million visitors every year.
  • Conflicts can occur between visitors, farmers, local residents, environmentalists and the army, all of whom have different ideas over how the land should be used.
  • In many developing countries tourism is seen to be the answer to their economic problems.
  • However, as increasing numbers of people flood into places like Kenya, they are finding that tourism brings with it a range of environmental, cultural and social problems.
  • The increase in tourism has led to economic growth and the creation of many jobs for local people.
  • There are many problems caused by the massive numbers of tourists, such as environmental damage, cultures being lost and a reliance on the tourist industry.
  • Ecotourism or Green Tourism is aimed at allowing people to visit naturally beautiful environments whilst protecting them for the future at the same time.
  • Ecotourism also aims to benefit the local people directly. One country to try this new form of tourism is Belize, on the Caribbean coast of Central America.
  • The main aim is to achieve sustainability, which means that the environment is not in any way damaged by the tourists.
  • All that is being attempted in Belize is building towards the goal of continuing to benefit from tourism, whilst protecting and nurturing the natural environment.
  • Tourism has both positive and negative impacts for an area.
  • Tourism brings much needed investment into an area.
  • Tourism provides employment for many local people.
  • Income from tourism may be used to help conserve the natural environment.
  • Tourism may help to preserve local cultures and communities.
  • The jobs for the locals are often badly paid, with very poor working conditions.
  • The environment could easily be damaged by the huge number of tourists coming to see it.
  • Increasing numbers of tourists brings problems such as littering, pollution and footpath erosion.
  • Local cultures could be devalued by tourism.