What is Dyslexia

 

 

What is Dyslexia?

 

 

  • Dyslexia is a specific learning difficulty that can make learning to read, write and spell difficult. Mathematics and the ability to read music may also be affected.
  • Phonological awareness is the understanding that all words can be broken down into units of sound and that all spoken words can be represented in the written form. This awareness is very often missing in dyslexic children and adults.
  • Dyslexia is a complex learning difficulty because of the number of characteristics that are associated with it, such as poor short-term memory or confusion about left and right. The characteristics that one dyslexic individual might have, can be different to those of another.
  • The severity of the dyslexia can vary from mild to very severe, between different dyslexic individuals.
  • Dyslexia can occur at any level of intellectual ability.
  • Dyslexia is not a disease but it does have a biological cause, and it can run in families

 

Could I be Dyslexic?

 

 

Dyslexia is relatively common. It affects approximately 4% of the population. Dyslexia can affect anyone, at any age. Do not stay in the dark about any difficulties you may have. If the answer to most of the following questions is 'yes', you would be wise to seek further advice.

Do you:
  • Make unexpected errors when reading aloud?
  • Miss words out or read the wrong word?
  • Take ages to read a book and understand it?
  • Have difficulties with spelling?
  • Have difficulties copying and taking notes?
  • Have difficulties planning essays?
  • Confuse telephone messages?
  • Find it difficult to remember a series of numbers, such as a telephone number?
  • Find it difficult to remember a list of instructions that the teacher has given to the class?
  • Find mental arithmetic difficult?

 

 

What should I do if I think I could be dyslexic?

 

 

  • Talk to your parents.
  • Talk to your teachers.
  • Contact your local Dyslexia Institute Centre.

 Please click the link if you wish to look at the Dyslexia Institute website (www.dyslexiaaction.org.uk).

 

 

Being dyslexic does not have to hold you back. You can succeed. There are many famous people who are/were both dyslexic and successful, such as Richard Branson, Tom Cruise and Albert Einstein. If you need help in order to succeed, do not be ashamed to ask.